Saturday, April 26, 2008

Saturday Morning (Journalism) Quarterback

The top five stories worth reading from this past week in worth-reading stories:

We start this week in honor of earth day.

Why don't poems rhyme anymore? (Always good to see poetry make its way into other culture!)

In economic news, the dollar is being supplanted by the euro, and the Financial Times Of London says we're at a turning point in the world's economy. The Huffington Post outlines the simple arithmetic of Republican failure, and The Tom Dispatch says we're in a second Gilded Age.

the New York Times has an important article on the military message machine.

Finally this week, Alternet looks into the battle for the world's food supply. Slate says the food press rarely talks dollars and cents, Vanity Fair says fish stocks are crashing and lastly, is organic food really healthier?

Saturday, April 19, 2008

Saturday Morning (Journalism) Quarterback

The top five stories worth reading from this past week in worth-reading stories:

This week we start with a widely used American Government textbook written by conservatives, and littered with global warming misinformation.

A fun FAQ on poetry by Robert Pinsky.

In economics this week, Salon reports on the American empire of debt, The New York Times says IRS scrutiny of the top twenty companies is at a historic low. The Boston Globe reports that the credit crisis is hitting student loans. Alternet reports that the US still attempts to control Iraq oil and economy continue behind the scenes. The American Prospect wonders, should you spend your George Bush tax rebate? Buzzflash looks into the Reagan myth and the middle class, and finally, financial regulation is essential.

In a series of important food and water stories this week, The Financial Times Of London reports on the global grain trade, the largest grain exporters halting foreign sales, countries are making secret deals over grain export, and rice prices skyrocket. Also, the US water supply is in trouble.

Finally this week, do carbon offsets really help?

Saturday, April 12, 2008

Saturday Morning (Journalism) Quarterback

The top five stories worth reading from this past week in worth-reading stories:

This week brought us the origin of the crossword puzzle AND the man who made the Thesaurus!

Salon tell us how how The Slaughter-House Five was born. The Financial Times Of London asks if there's a generational literacy shift, The Nation remembers the five year anniversary of U.S. soldiers watching the Iraq National Library sacked and we're left wondering, did the Sixties achieve nothing?

In environmental news this week, we're posed wit the question: could we meet our energy demand with solar panels along? Alternet says those who control oil and water control the world, and the case of Nestle v. Florida over water rights illustrates the point. Common Dreams addresses the global grain problem, plus truckers put on the brakes to protest gas prices, and The American Prospect says No art for oil!

In economics, big brokers blew it and should bear the cost, we've had three straight months of job loss, the cost of the Iraq occupation may STILL be understated and US business regulation needs more than just tuning.

This week in Science! news, Texans built the world's most powerful laser, a new super quasar has been discovered and finally, Biomimetics: the science and art of looking at nature for design inspiration.

Saturday, April 05, 2008

Saturday Morning (Journalism) Quarterback

The top five stories worth reading from this past week in worth-reading stories:

This week's roundup starts, as it always does this week, with comic books, and a recent court ruling on the rights to Superman.

Of concern to all of us this week, Vanity Fair has a story on the danger of Monsanto to the food supply. Alternet says nutrition "science" has hijacked our meals, and could we drink beer and save the world?

The Nation
celebrates Alice Notley.

In economics this week, the Boston Globe has the single most important story to ever hit those of us who love pancakes (read: everyone living and dead, and possibly alien life as well: the skyrocketing cost of maple syrup. Salon brings us The Great Depression redux; The Christian Science Monitor reports on the Wall Street crisis trickling down (something Reaganomics never did). The American Prospect reports on the FED and crony capitalism; Mother Jones says "it's deruglation, stupid", and Truth Dig reports on the decriminalization of corporate crime. Finally, The Financial Times Of London says false ideology is at the heart of the financial crisis.

Lastly this week, an important piece by Howard Zinn on empire or humanity.